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DC Sexual Assault Awareness Month 2019 Action Guide

Every April, the District of Columbia comes together to raise awareness about sexual assault and celebrate organizations supporting survivors and allies during DC Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

To spread these important messages and engage local communities across the city, the 2019 Action Guide puts a range of digital media resources in one place. In the following pages, our guide will provide sample posts, statistics, graphics and other tools for your organization’s social media pages throughout the month. As a partner in this effort, your support will help set the course for an informative, empowering month by leveraging the reach of digital media.

Download the Action Guide.

Update your Twitter and Facebook profiles for Sexual Assault Awareness Month with our DCSAAM cover photos.

Download and share our graphics on your social media, website and at local events to show your support for survivors everywhere.

 
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Social Media Hub
Join the online conversation! Follow the DC Coalition to End Sexual Violence to stay up-to-date on activities and events throughout the month. Through launch, we’ll be retweeting and engaging with relevant content, and we encourage your organization to do the same. When posting on your channels, be sure to tag our handles and use the official DC Sexual Assault Awareness Month hashtag – #DCSAAM – to help other users find your content.

Save the Dates
Our full events calendar for DC Sexual Assault Awareness Month is available at dccesv.org/events.

Social Media Best Practices

Aim to include a link and image or video in every post. Studies show that Tweets with images receive 18% more click-throughs, more likes and 150% more retweets. Similarly, Facebook posts with images see 2.3x more engagement than those without images.

When posting a link, make sure that the metadata (which populates the link title, description, and sometimes image) is accurate, clear and easy to read. You may test on Twitter and Facebook using the Twitter Card Validator and Facebook Debugger Tool, respectively.

Links in content should primarily drive to your website to help increase traffic.

Maintain a good balance between content you create and existing social content such as retweets and Facebook shares.

Use concise language. Avoid using complex, formal jargon and speak with a conversational tone as much as possible.

Use a variety of posts including statistics, questions, quotes, short sentences, calls-to-action, cliffhangers, etc.

If a video is part of the post and the original video file is in possession, upload the video natively rather than linking to the video on YouTube or other video-sharing platforms.



Sample Social Media Posts

Below are some posts you can use throughout Sexual Assault Awareness Month to engage your followers. Using the social media best practices from the previous pages, feel free to adapt these posts to best suit the authentic voice of your channels. And consider pinning your best DCSAAM tweets and Facebook posts to your profile all month long, so that these posts are the first ones visitors to your pages see.

This month and every month, I #SupportSurvivors of sexual assault. Learn more about how you can too at dccesv.org #DCSAAM

Sexual assault can happen to anyone, regardless of race, age, gender identity, sexual orientation or background. I pledge to raise awareness for #DCSAAM and take action as a bystander – because everyone deserves to be heard and supported. dccesv.org

Make an impact in your community this Sexual Assault Awareness Month by getting involved and showing support for survivors. Check out this month’s events calendar: dccesv.org #DCSAAM

I’m painting Washington DC teal this April for Sexual Assault Awareness Month! Learn more and join me at dccesv.org #DCSAAM

The DC community has incredible resources to help survivors of sexual assault. Available in 8 languages, check out @ASKDCApp to learn more. askdc.org #DCSAAM

Download the #UASKDC app to see all the resources your college or university offers in the event of sexual assault. uaskdc.org #DCSAAM

Today, I’m wearing teal to show my solidarity with survivors of sexual assault. Every day, we’re working to create new tools for prevention and response – identifying solutions that can make a difference. Learn more: dccesv.org #TealTuesday #DCSAAM

It’s #TealTuesday! I’m wearing teal to raise awareness and honor the resilience of survivors of sexual assault. Together, we can create cultures free from sexual assault. dccesv.org #DCSAAM

Today is #DenimDay, when supporters around the world wear denim to bring awareness to misconceptions surrounding sexual assault. Make a social statement with your fashion statement and learn more: denimdayinfo.org #DCSAAM

Where Do You Stand is a unique bystander intervention and consent campaign focusing on the role of young men and boys in preventing sexual assault, dating violence and cyberstalking. This #DCSAAM, take a moment to learn more about bystander intervention. https://wdys.shop/

Community-Specific Facts About Sexual Assault

INCLUSION STATEMENT: Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) is about raising awareness, learning how to prevent and end sexual violence, and supporting victim-survivors. In keeping with this goal, we ask everyone participating in SAAM to remember that these statistics are one way we can seek to respect the whole person. We value emotional, social, and academic learning; developing connections among people with different views; creating a more participatory community; and recognizing all the expertise and insight in our diverse and global city. SAAM is an opportunity to occupy space and collaborate in equitable ways. It is about honoring all people and their ability to prevent and end gender-based violence, regardless of race, color, creed, ethnicity, religion, genders, gender identity or expression, age, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, physical ability, citizen status, veteran status, marital status, or HIV status and valuing their story, knowledge, and worth.

GENERAL

· According to RAINN, every 98 seconds an American is sexually assaulted; every eight minutes a child is sexually assaulted; and only six of every 1,000 perpetrators will be incarcerated for committing sexual assault.

· According to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 70% of child sex offenders have between one and nine victims, while 20% have 10 to 40 victims.

· According to the National Crime Victim Survey, administered by the Bureau of Justice, in 2016 only 23% of sexual assaults were reported to law enforcement.

· According to the National Crime Victim Survey, administered by the Bureau of Justice, in 2016 39% of sexual assault was perpetrated by someone known to the victim-survivor. 33% were assaulted by a current or former intimate partner. 19% victim-survivors were assaulted by a stranger.

RACIAL IDENTITY

· According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among adult women surveyed in 2010, 26.9% of American Indian/Alaska Natives, 22% of non-Hispanic Blacks, 18.8% of non-Hispanic whites, 14.6% of Hispanics, and 35.5% of women of multiple races experienced an attempted or a completed rape at some time in their lives.

· According to the Women of Color Network, approximately 40% of Black women report coercive contact of a sexual nature by age 18; and the National Violence Against Women Survey found that 18.8% of African American women reported rape in their lifetime.

· According to the Women of Color Network, the National Violence Against Women Survey found that 6.8% of Asian/Pacific Islander women reported rape in their lifetime.

· According to the Asian Pacific Institute on Gender Based Violence, 56% of Filipinas and 64% of Indian and Pakistani women had experienced sexual violence by an intimate.

· According to RAINN, American Indians are twice as likely to experience a rape/sexual assault compared to all races; and 41% of sexual assaults against American Indians are committed by a stranger, 34% by an acquaintance, and 25% by an intimate or family member.

· According to the Women of Color Network, a U.S. study of violence between intimate partners found that Latinas report rape at a 2.2% higher level than white women; approximately 7.9% of Latinas will be raped by a spouse, boyfriend, or ex-boyfriend during their lifetime; and the National Violence Against Women Survey found that 11.9% of Hispanic white women reported rape in their lifetime.

IMMIGRANTS & REFUGEES

· According to Rape Response Services, married immigrant women experience higher levels of physical and sexual abuse than unmarried immigrant women, 59.5% compared to 49.8%, respectively.

· According to the National Immigrant Women’s Advocacy Project, immigrant women are less likely to report their experiences of abuse than U.S. born women because language barriers between victims and police officers significantly affect the outcome of victims’ interactions with police and deter many immigrant and limited English proficient (LEP) women from reporting abuse and one of the most significant factors affecting a woman’s decision to report abuse is her immigration status.

· According to the National Immigrant Women’s Advocacy Project, a study conducted among high school aged girls found immigrant girls are almost twice as likely as their non-immigrant peers to have experienced recurring incidents of sexual assault.

LGBTQIA (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, Asexual)

· According to FORGE, multiple studies indicate that over 50% of transgender people have experienced sexual violence at some point in their lives. This rate is nearly double (1 in 3 girls) or triple (1 in 6 boys) the commonly reported rates of sexual abuse.

· According to RAINN, 21% of TGQN (transgender, genderqueer, nonconforming) college students have been sexually assaulted, compared to 18% of non-TGQN females, and 4% of non-TGQN males.

· The 2011 Injustice at Every Turn report found that 12% of transgender youth report being sexually assaulted in K–12 settings by peers or educational staff; 13% of African-American transgender people surveyed were sexually assaulted in the workplace; and 22% of homeless transgender individuals were assaulted while staying in shelters.

· According to the Human Rights Campaign, 44% of lesbians and 61% of bisexual women experience rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, compared to 35% of heterosexual women; 26% of gay men and 37% of bisexual men experience rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, compared to 29% of heterosexual men; 46% of bisexual women have been raped, compared to 17% of heterosexual women and 13% of lesbians; 22% of bisexual women have been raped by an intimate partner, compared to 9% of heterosexual women; and 40% of gay men and 47% of bisexual men have experienced sexual violence other than rape, compared to 21% of heterosexual men.

· According to Rape Response Services, the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs reports that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer people were three times more likely to report sexual violence and/or harassment compared to heterosexual people.

PEOPLE WITH DIFFERING ABILITIES

· According to the National Crime Victim Survey, administered by the Bureau of Justice, 35% of individuals with disabilities who participated in a 2011-2015 study reported that they had been raped or sexually assaulted.

· According to a report published by National Public Radio, people with intellectual disabilities are more than seven times more likely to be victim-survivors of sexual assault than those without an intellectual disability. Women with intellectual disabilities are more than 12 times more likely to be sexually assaulted than women without intellectual disabilities.

· According to National Council on Disability, a recent study surveying the rate of sexual assault amongst national universities indicated that 31.6% of female undergraduates with a disability were sexual assault victim-survivors while the correlating rate for undergraduate females without a disability was 18.4%.

According to the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs: · 80% of women and 30% of men with intellectual disabilities have been sexually assaulted; and 50% of those women have been assaulted more than ten times.

· 83% of women with disabilities will be sexually assaulted in their lifetime; and only 3% of sexual abuse cases involving people with developmental disabilities are ever reported.

· 54% of boys who are Deaf have been sexually abused, compared to 10% of boys who are hearing; and 50% of girls who are Deaf have been sexually abused, compared to 25% of girls who are hearing.

CHILDREN AND YOUTH

· According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 42.2% of female rape victims were first raped before age 18.

· According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among high school students, 12.5% of American Indian/Alaska Natives, 10.5% of Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander students, 8.6% of Black students, 8.2% of Hispanic students, 7.4% of white students, and 13.5% of multiple-race students reported that they were forced to have sexual intercourse at some time in their lives.

· According to Rape Response Services, persons under 18 years of age account for 67% of all sexual assault victimizations reported to law enforcement agencies; children under twelve years old account for 34% of those cases; and children under six years old account for 14% of those cases.

· According to Rape Response Services, more than one-third of women who were raped as minors were also raped as adults, compared to 14% without an early rape history.

COMMERCIAL SEXUAL EXPLOITATION

· According to World Without Exploitation, between 33% and 84% of victims of commercial sexual exploitation are survivors of childhood sexual abuse; and 87% of youth involved in commercial sexual exploitation with a history of sexual abuse are runaways.

· According to World Without Exploitation, the prevalence of childhood sexual abuse in samples of victims of commercial sexual exploitation is 3 times to 9 times higher than that of the general population.

· According to the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 68% of adolescents that were victims of commercial sexual exploitation were sexually abused in childhood; and for girls in the sex trade, the average age of sexual victimization to begin was 7.8 years old.

· According to Shared Hope International, youth with a history of sexual abuse may have an increased risk of being trafficked.

· According to the FBI, almost 53% of all juvenile prostitution arrests involve Black children.

· According to the District of Columbia Statistical Analysis Center, in DC Black girls in their teens and 20s were the largest proportion of trafficking victims in 2016.

· According to the American Journal of Health Behavior, 44% of women engaged in street prostitution in DC reported unwanted sexual contact as children; and 44% of sex trade-involved women had been raped while in the sex trade, with 60% of those rapes by customers.

INCARCERATED

· According to the National Crime Victim Survey, administered by the Bureau of Justice, 80,600 inmates reported being sexually assaulted in a one-year study.

· According to the National Crime Victim Survey, administered by the Bureau of Justice, approximately 200,000 prisoners in the United States prisons and jails face sexual abuse annually.

· A 2016 study by the Vera Institute of Justice found that 86% of women in jail had experienced sexual violence in their lifetime.

MILITARY

· According to the US Department of Defense, 112 reports of sexual violence were reported during the 2016-2017 academic year at three Military Service Academies, an increase from 86 assaults reported during the prior academic year.

· According to a report published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, in U.S. Military academies approximately 60% of cadets and midshipmen experienced at least one type of sexual victimization; 86% of female cadets and midshipmen were sexually victimized; and 42% of male cadets and midshipmen were sexually victimized.

· According to RAINN, during FY14 18,900 members of the military experienced unwanted sexual contact.